Self-heal or Prunella vulgaris

Self-heal or Prunella vulgaris

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Prunella vulgaris (known as common self-heal , heal-all, woundwort, heart-of-the-earth, carpenter’s herb, brownwort and blue curls) is an herbaceous plant in the genus Prunella. Self-heal is edible: the young leaves and stems can be eaten raw in salads; the plant in whole can be boiled and eaten as a potherb; and the aerial parts of the plant can be powdered and brewed in a cold infusion to make a beverage.
Prunella vulgaris Self Heal plant
Scientific classification:
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Lamiales
Family: Lamiaceae
Genus: Prunella
Species: P. vulgaris
Binomial name: Prunella vulgaris

Description:

Prunella vulgaris grows 5 to 30 cm high (2-12inches), with creeping, self-rooting, tough, square, reddish stems branching at leaf axis. The leaves are lance shaped, serrated and reddish at the tip, about 2.5 cm (1 inch) long and 1.5 cm (half an inch) broad, and growing in opposite pairs down the square stem.[5]Each leaf has 3-7 veins that shoot off the middle vein to the margin. The stalks of the leaves are generally short, but can be up to 5 cm (2 inches) long. The flowers grow from a clublike, somewhat square, whirled cluster; immediately below this club is a pair of stalk-less leaves standing out on either side like a collar. Flowers are two lipped and tubular. The top lip is a purple hood, and the bottom lip is often white; it has three lobes, with the middle lobe being larger and fringed upwardly. Flowers bloom at different times depending on climate and other conditions, but mostly in summer (from June to August in the USA).

Edibility:

Heal-all is edible, and can be used in salads, soups, stews, and boiled as a pot herb. The Cherokee cooked and ate the young leaves. The Nlaka’pamux drank a cold infusion of the whole plant as a common beverage. The plant contains vitamins A, C, and K, as well as flavonoids and rutin.

Folk medicine:

Topically, a poultice of the plant is applied to irritated skin, as a disinfecting agent and to pack wounds in the absence of other wound-care material. It is considered by the Chinese to “change the course of a chronic disease”.

 


Bibliographic details for “Prunella vulgaris”
Page name: Prunella vulgaris
Author: Wikipedia contributors
Publisher: Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia.
Date of last revision: 7 November 2017 01:03 UTC
Date retrieved: 8 December 2017 23:30 UTC
Permanent link: https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Prunella_vulgaris&oldid=809083166
Primary contributors: Revision history statistics
Page Version ID: 809083166